Security Problem and Solution of BYOD

Security Problem and Solution of BYOD

BYOD or Bring your Own device refers to the policy of permitting employees to bring personally owned mobile devices (laptops, tablets, and smart phones) to their workplace, and to use those devices to access privileged company information and applications. The phenomenon is commonly referred to as IT consumerization. The term is also used to describe the same practice applied to students using personally owned devices in education settings.

iOS 10: How Secure is Apple's Closed-Ended Operating System?

iOS 10: How Secure is Apple's Closed-Ended Operating System?

Buying an iPhone means trading off on a lot of brilliant open-ended features offered by Google’s smartphone counterpart. My own personal inclinations aside, there is nothing wrong in saying that an Android-based smartphone such as the Samsung Galaxy S7 or the celebrated Google Pixel is considerably more innovative and powerful than an iPhone 7. However, the tradeoff is generally worth it for Apple users for one specific reason: security.

Supporting and protecting the mobile enterprise: Think big

Supporting and protecting the mobile enterprise: Think big

The number of connected devices at Intermountain Healthcare has grown exponentially in recent years.

The Salt Lake City-based healthcare system has 10,000 laptops and another 20,000 tablets and smartphones. Then there are numerous other smart devices, such as fetal monitors, oxygen monitors and defibrillators, that store, process and/or transmit data.

School BYOD policy to grow in coming years

School BYOD policy to grow in coming years

Six St. Johns County schools are testing a “bring your own device” policy that could alleviate some of the financial strain the school district is facing from the state’s push for digital.

The district is phasing in BYOD — which allows students to bring personal smart phones, tablets and laptops into the classroom — as schools complete necessary infrastructure, wireless internet and bandwidth updates. The policy isn’t mandatory, but it could solve a costly per-student device dilemma.

Smartphone motion sensors can reveal your security PIN to hackers

Smartphone motion sensors can reveal your security PIN to hackers

Think about all the things you can do with your smartphone. Texting and email, browsing the internet, banking transactions, checking the status of your filed income taxes, just to name a few.

Now imagine all of the sensitive data associated with those tasks getting into the wrong hands. Yikes! It turns out that criminals could steal all of that information and you won't believe how simple it is for them to do.

Google Play Store Security Update: Available Android Apps May Not Be Safe For Download, Find Out Why

Google Play Store Security Update: Available Android Apps May Not Be Safe For Download, Find Out Why

There are tons of mobile apps that one can get from the Google Play Store, a mix of free and paid applications. Getting hold of official Android apps there should be safe until a study came out to indicate otherwise. Though the explanation is broad, the fact of the matter is that there are some apps which may be up to no good.

CIA now hacking into smart TVs, iPhones, Android devices: Wikileaks

CIA now hacking into smart TVs, iPhones, Android devices: Wikileaks

If you have switched off the TV set and begun a confidential discussion in your drawing room, beware as the TV set may be spying on you -- courtesy the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

In a new set of leaked documents, global whistleblower agency Wikileaks has claimed that CIA has developed new malware and hacking tools that can even hack into your TV.

APPLE RUSHES OUT IOS PATCH FOR WI-FI VULNERABILITY

APPLE RUSHES OUT IOS PATCH FOR WI-FI VULNERABILITY

Apple has released an urgent update to its iOS mobile operating system, just days after it distributed a new iOS 10.3 version to iPhone and iPad users around the world.

The update, iOS 10.3.1, takes care of a single vulnerability that could allow attackers to run arbitrary code on the wi-fi chip built into iPhone 5, iPad 4th generation and iPod Touch 6th generation and later devices, Apple said.

Google's Android hacking contest fails to attract exploits

Google's Android hacking contest fails to attract exploits

Six months ago, Google offered to pay US$200,000 to any researcher who could remotely hack into an Android device by knowing only the victim's phone number and email address. No one stepped up to the challenge.